Timey Wimey Yard Farmer

growing an edible yard...and other lost arts

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Today’s harvest from the “cocktail garden”:  Limes.  Ooooh baby.  Two years ago a friend introduced us to the lovely Moscow Mule, a vintage 1941 cocktail.  A new purpose for my lime tree.  A companion to the Maui Rum Mojito.  Yesterday I purchased two copper mugs specifically for this year’s harvest.  Copper mugs being the traditional vessel for such concoction.  Today, right now in fact, I am enjoying this in the back garden:

Moscow Mule

1/2 lime | 1 1/2 shots of vodka | ginger beer

Add ice to a frosted copper mug, squeeze lime juice over ice, add vodka, and fill cup with ginger beer.  Add garnish of lime to the frosty drink and sit back and enjoy.

Filed under garden harvest recipe cocktail timey wimey

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Surprise in the garden.  This year, after three years of building my yardfarm - something of somewhat of a surprise popped up.  When I first moved in, I spent several months clearing brush, saplings, and vines out of the backyard.  One of these included two old fig stumps - which I couldn’t quite remove by myself so I just keep cutting them back again and again.  They had never produced figs, so I did not want them.  Then, last summer, after removing two large ash trees near the fence line close to the house… the fence line began to look hot and bare.  And, this year, since I was growing and watering zinnias by the fence for the butterflies, the water seeped into the fig stumps and they got lush and bushy.  They were shaped nice and had interesting shaped leaves….so I decided to leave them to give the fence “structure” and green it up….  And then one day out of the blue while I noticed the zinnias starting to bloom I saw them.  A handful of tiny green figs.  As I have been watching them get bigger and bigger, I wondered “So how do I know when they are ripe?”, says the Midwestern girl.  This is what I have just learned:  It is less about the color and more about how they hang on the tree.  If they are firm and hanging straight out: Not ripe.  If they start hanging down (see picture above) and swelling, even splitting:  Ripe.  Pick before birds.  So this is my task now - watching figs ripen.  Not a bad way to spend summer mornings.

Surprise in the garden.  This year, after three years of building my yardfarm - something of somewhat of a surprise popped up.  When I first moved in, I spent several months clearing brush, saplings, and vines out of the backyard.  One of these included two old fig stumps - which I couldn’t quite remove by myself so I just keep cutting them back again and again.  They had never produced figs, so I did not want them.  Then, last summer, after removing two large ash trees near the fence line close to the house… the fence line began to look hot and bare.  And, this year, since I was growing and watering zinnias by the fence for the butterflies, the water seeped into the fig stumps and they got lush and bushy.  They were shaped nice and had interesting shaped leaves….so I decided to leave them to give the fence “structure” and green it up….  And then one day out of the blue while I noticed the zinnias starting to bloom I saw them.  A handful of tiny green figs.  As I have been watching them get bigger and bigger, I wondered “So how do I know when they are ripe?”, says the Midwestern girl.  This is what I have just learned:  It is less about the color and more about how they hang on the tree.  If they are firm and hanging straight out: Not ripe.  If they start hanging down (see picture above) and swelling, even splitting:  Ripe.  Pick before birds.  So this is my task now - watching figs ripen.  Not a bad way to spend summer mornings.

Filed under garden

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One of my purchases this spring was 3 columnar bottlebrush trees. Callistemon species are native to Australia and can definitely handle the dry climate of Southern California.  I needed something that I only had to water infrequently, something tall and skinny to be a “green” curtain to my bare livingroom windows but not spread into the driveway outside, and preferably something with either red berries or flowers that birds liked.  I wanted to be able to watch them outside my windows. Tall order, I know.  I was a plant hunter for quite a while until I found these.  And now, they have already grown at least 6 inches taller, and already attract some fast feathered friends.  I love hummingbirds.  I love that a group of them is called a “charm”.  Charming indeed.  This post is dedicated to my dear friend, Betty. Hugs.

One of my purchases this spring was 3 columnar bottlebrush trees. Callistemon species are native to Australia and can definitely handle the dry climate of Southern California.  I needed something that I only had to water infrequently, something tall and skinny to be a “green” curtain to my bare livingroom windows but not spread into the driveway outside, and preferably something with either red berries or flowers that birds liked.  I wanted to be able to watch them outside my windows. Tall order, I know.  I was a plant hunter for quite a while until I found these.  And now, they have already grown at least 6 inches taller, and already attract some fast feathered friends.  I love hummingbirds.  I love that a group of them is called a “charm”.  Charming indeed.  This post is dedicated to my dear friend, Betty. Hugs.

Filed under garden fauna

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Tiny timeywimey garden plan from the 2007 Chelsea Flower Show.  The garden was titled “A Garden in Time”. 
Wish I could have seen it.  xoxo <3

Tiny timeywimey garden plan from the 2007 Chelsea Flower Show.  The garden was titled “A Garden in Time”. 

Wish I could have seen it.  xoxo <3

Filed under timey wimey

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TimeyWimeyPhone&#8230;.. want.
So similar to one I was looking at recently.
re~blogged from: idigressonline.com

TimeyWimeyPhone….. want.

So similar to one I was looking at recently.

re~blogged from: idigressonline.com

Filed under timey wimey

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A companion garden of eatn’~ 3 years in the making.  Three years ago I received a lovely gift in the mail of 24 daylily rootstocks.  That winter I planted them and  babied them until they all sprouted.  Then that spring I interplanted them with New Zealand Spinach seeds.  My thought was when the daylilies were growing in the spring, the spinach would grow full and protect the daylilies, and as I harvested the spinach it would be time for the daylilies to grow tall and protect the spinach from the heat of summer.  And, in the middle of summer, a treat of herbed cream cheese-filled daylily blossoms would be on the garden menu.  A garden dream realized.  (And plenty of spinach in the freezer while more grows every day ~  as it is guarded by my faithful garden companion, Molly.

Filed under garden recipe harvest

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One timey wimey piece for the garden I have been on the lookout for:  a Jeffersonian wind gauge.  Thomas Jefferson was an avid plantsman and weather watcher.  He devised several useful weather instruments in his time.  We don&#8217;t get much rain here so a Jeffersonian rain gauge would be second on my list. Wind, however, comes each year by the name of the &#8220;Santa Ana&#8217;s&#8221;.  I also collect blue glass, so this adds extra interest for me.

One timey wimey piece for the garden I have been on the lookout for:  a Jeffersonian wind gauge.  Thomas Jefferson was an avid plantsman and weather watcher.  He devised several useful weather instruments in his time.  We don’t get much rain here so a Jeffersonian rain gauge would be second on my list. Wind, however, comes each year by the name of the “Santa Ana’s”.  I also collect blue glass, so this adds extra interest for me.

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This year for my birthday I planted (with my mom) 100 grape hyacinth bulbs that my dear boyfriend gave me.  I planted them under our lovely crooked apple tree in the front yard, with the hope of creating a scene like this one someday.  Grape hyacinths are one of the few spring bulbs that I grew up with that can handle the heat and drought here.  The rest of the front yard will be native drought tolerant plants that only need the &#8220;winter&#8221; rains and no more.  Saving irrigation needs for my yardfarm out back.  As of today, 4 bulbs have popped up (one week after planting&#8230;) and hopefully more to come.  xoxo

This year for my birthday I planted (with my mom) 100 grape hyacinth bulbs that my dear boyfriend gave me.  I planted them under our lovely crooked apple tree in the front yard, with the hope of creating a scene like this one someday.  Grape hyacinths are one of the few spring bulbs that I grew up with that can handle the heat and drought here.  The rest of the front yard will be native drought tolerant plants that only need the “winter” rains and no more.  Saving irrigation needs for my yardfarm out back.  As of today, 4 bulbs have popped up (one week after planting…) and hopefully more to come.  xoxo

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I had this idea for a watch about 3 years ago when I was searching for a sundial for my garden&#8230;. and just realized that FOSSIL invented one in the 80&#8217;s. Great minds&#8230;.   Truly Timey Wimey.  &lt;3  Want.

I had this idea for a watch about 3 years ago when I was searching for a sundial for my garden…. and just realized that FOSSIL invented one in the 80’s. Great minds….   Truly Timey Wimey.  <3  Want.

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What a wonderful thing is the mail, capable of conveying across continents a warm human hand-clasp. ~Author Unknown

Filed under mail